Monday, 10 April 2017

Unknown Pyramid TWICE The Size Of Giza Found In CHINA

The ancient pyramid is situated around 40 miles southwest of Xian, the biggest of sixteen pyramids situated in the territory assigned as a Shensi, or a "no-go range", an illegal zone by the Communist government.


These confinements make it to a great degree troublesome for Westerners to visit the pyramid and take photos of it. But only a few people from the West have managed to view this unknown massive ancient pyramid.

It is still unknown when precisely the Great Pyramid of China was built. According to some Chinese archeologists the pyramid was erected amid the Hsia Dynasty from 2205 to 1767 B.C.

Ancient records protected in an old monastery close to the Mongolian border describe the ancient Xian pyramid in China.
Apparently, when these ancient records were first created, the huge mysterious pyramid was already extremely old.

The structure was said to be 1,000 feet in stature which made it the most elevated pyramid on the planet (the Great Pyramid of Egypt is 450 feet in height.)

The valleys in the area of the Xian pyramid are many different pyramids, some ascending to a height practically as big as the Xian pyramid.

Of what is known, the first Westerners to see the Chinese pyramid were two Australian merchants. Afterward, in 1912, Fred Meyer Schroeder, an American dealer employed a monk as a guide, who enlightened him about the monastery on the fact it contained vital data about the Xian pyramid.

The following person from the West who saw the Great Pyramid of China was James Gaussman, an American pilot. Amid WWII, Gaussman flew a C-47 transport plane with provisions from a U.S. base in India.

After two years, Sheahan another American pilot who had known about Gaussman's locating effectively found the Xian pyramid. He took a few photos which were distributed in the March 28, 1947 issue of the New York Times.
Chinese archeologists fully denied the presence of the Xian pyramid even with evidence in Sheahan's photos.

German analyst and adventurer Hartwig Hausdorf knew about the pyramid fifty years later he chose to go to China, with the expectation he could take in more about this strange old structure and its unknown ancient builders.

Hausdorf immediately saw how hesitant the Chinese were to talk about their pyramids. In the wake of taking a gander at Gaussman's photographs, Chinese archeologists unwillingly affirmed their reality by alluding to them as "only a couple of pyramidal structures close to Xian."


Whenever Hausdorf and his companion Peter Krassa arrived at the township of Xianyang, around 40 miles west of Xian they saw no less than 15 pyramids in the territory. The two scientists were shocked to see little trees planted on the sides of the pyramids to keep them covered up and blend in with the natural surrounding landscape.


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